e-Learning Ecologies

This course is offered through Coursera — you can add it to your Accredible profile to organize your learning, find others learning the same thing and to showcase evidence of your learning on your CV with Accredible's export features.


Course Date: 30 June 2014 to 25 August 2014 (8 weeks)

Price: free

Course Summary

This course introduces innovative approaches to learning and teaching, with a focus on the use of e-learning and social web technologies.


Estimated Workload: 1-10 hours/week

Course Instructors

William Cope

Bill Cope is a Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Illinois. He is Principal Investigator in a series of major projects funded by the Institute of Educational Sciences in the US Department of Education and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation researching and developing educational technologies. From 2010-2013 he was Chair of the Journals Publication Committee of the American Educational Research Association. Recent books include The Future of the Academic Journal, (with Angus Phillips, eds) Chandos, Oxford, 2009/2nd edition 2014, and Towards a Semantic Web: Connecting Knowledge in Academic Research, (with Kalantzis and Magee), Woodhead, Cambridge, 2010. He is has one patent and two patents pending in the fields of e-learning and web publishing. With Mary Kalantzis, he is co-author of New Learning: Elements of a Science of Education, Cambridge University Press, 2008/2nd edition 2012 and Literacies, Cambridge University Press, 2012; and co-editor of Ubiquitous Learning, University of Illinois Press, 2009. 

Mary Kalantzis

Mary Kalantzis is Dean of the College of Education at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She was formerly Dean of the Faculty of Education, Language and Community Services at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, and President of the Australian Council of Deans of Education. With Bill Cope, she is co-author of New Learning: Elements of a Science of Education, Cambridge University Press, 2008/2nd edition 2012 and Literacies, Cambridge University Press, 2012; and co-editor of Ubiquitous Learning, University of Illinois Press, 2009.

Course Description

For three decades and more, we’ve heard educators and technologists making a case for the transformative power of technology in learning. However, despite the rhetoric, in many sites and many ways education is still relatively untouched by technology. Even when technologies are introduced, the changes sometimes seem insignificant and the results disappointing. If the print textbook is replaced by an e-book, do the social relations of knowledge and learning necessarily change, at all or for the better? If the pen-and-paper test is mechanized, does this change the nature of our assessment systems? Technology, in other words, need not necessarily bring significant change. It might not even represent a step forward in education.

This course explores ‘seven affordances’ of e-learning ecologies which open out genuine possibilities for what we call a ‘New Learning’ – transformative, twenty-first century learning:

  1. Ubiquitous Learning
  2. Active Knowledge Making
  3. Multimodal Meaning
  4. Recursive Feedback
  5. Collaborative Intelligence
  6. Metacognition
  7. Differentiated Learning

These affordances, if recognized and harnessed, will prepare learners for success in  a world that is increasingly dominated by digital information flows, and tools for communication in the workplace, public spaces and personal life. This course offers a wide variety of examples of learning technologies and technology implementations that, to varying degrees, demonstrate these affordances in action.

 

FAQ

  • Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment after completing this class?

    Yes. Students who successfully complete the class at the Introductory or Advanced Levels will receive a Statement of Accomplishment signed by the instructor, indicating which level of attainment they have attained.

  • What resources will I need for this class?

    For this course, all you need is an Internet connection, and the time to read, write, discuss, and enjoy exploring some exciting ideas about the nature of knowledge and learning in the context of new media and digital information and communications technologies.

Syllabus

Week 1: Conceptualizing Learning

Laying some theoretical foundations: We can do a whole range of different things with learning technologies, ranging from "Didactic/Mimetic Teaching" to "Collaborative/Reflexive Learning". In this course we're interested to explore the affordances offered by learning technologies. However, in drawing a distinction between traditional modes of teaching and learning, we don't mean simply to say "out with the old, in with the new". Rather, we want to develop an approach in which didactic/mimetic and collaborative/reflexive pedagogies each has its place. In this perspective we might strategically choose to supplement, extend and enrich the old with the new.

Week 2: Spatio-Temporal Dimensions of Learning

Affordance: Ubiquitous Learning, from: learning bounded by the four walls of the classroom and cells of the timetable. (e.g. classroom-centered blended learning); to learning anywhere, anytime, anyhow.

Week 3: Epistemic Dimensions of Learning

Affordance: Active Knowledge Making, from: passive knowledge consumption, learner-as-knowledge-consumer; absorbing/replicating meanings (e.g. e-Textbooks); to learner-as-knowledge-producer, designing meanings.

Week 4: Discursive Dimensions of Learning

Affordance: Multimodal Meaning, from: traditional “academic literacies” (e.g. isolated digital spaces for text, image, video, data etc.); to new media texts, multimodal knowledge representations.

Week 5: Evaluative Dimensions of Learning

Affordance: Recursive Feedback, from: retrospective judgment and a managerialist focus on summative assessment (e.g. standardized machine assessments); to formative assessment, prospective and constructive feedback, big data and learning analytics.

Week 6: Social Dimensions of Learning

Affordance: Collaborative Intelligence, from: individualized learning (e.g. machine-teaching, intelligent tutors and self-regulated learning); to collaborative knowledge production and peer-to-peer learning.

Week 7: Cognitive Dimensions of Learning
Affordance: Metacognition, from:
single layered cognition and memory work (e.g. stuff to be e-learned: information, routines, definitions); to thinking about thinking and mnemonic work where external representations are created to assist recall.

Week 8: Diversity Dimensions of Learning

Affordance: Differentiated Learning, from: homogenizing, one-size-fits-all curriculum (e.g. self-paced e-textbooks, week-by-week learning management systems); to differentiated instruction where each learns according to their need, interest and identity.







Format

This course supports three levels of participation:

  1. e-Learning Ecologies Lite (L) - estimated time commitment, 1 hour per week
    • Watch the videos and view the material marked (L)
    • Comment on each week’s post, made by the course admin.
  2. e-Learning Ecologies Introductory (I) - estimated time commitment, 3 hours per week
    • Watch the videos and view the material marked (L) and (I)
    • Comment on each week’s post, made by the course admin.
    • Make a post of your own.
  3. e-Learning Ecologies Advanced (A) - estimated time commitment, 8-10 hours per week
    • Watch the videos and view the material marked (L), (I) and (A)
    • Comment on each week’s post, made by the course admin.
    • Make a post of your own.
    • Create two “Works”; peer review three others’ works; revise your work for web publication.

Suggested Reading

If you want to know more about our theory of “New Learning”, you may be interested in this book (though there is no need to purchase it for this course): New Learning: Elements of a Science of Education.

For more information about the research we do, visit our New Learning Online website.

During the course you will be encouraged to explore and share with others your findings about a wide range of e-learning technologies, and the ecologies they engender. You may also wish to join in our own e-learning research and development endeavor, by participating in this course in the Scholar platform, developed with the support of funding from the Institute of Educational Sciences, US Department of Education, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Course Workload

1-10 hours/week

Review course:

Please sign in to review this course.

Similar Courses


{{ course.name }} {{ course.name }}

{{ course.name}}

{{course.start_date | date:'MMM d'}} — {{ course.end_date | date:'MMM d'}}   ({{ course.time_until_course_starts }} ,   length: {{ course.length_in_weeks }} weeks) Self-paced — no deadlines    
${{ course.price }} p/mfree
TO-LEARN
TO-LEARN
ADDED!

REMOVE
FROM
LIST
ON PROFILE

Course Activity & Community

Be the first Accredible user to join this course!





uploaded {{ feed_item.model.caption || feed_item.model.url || feed_item.model.file_file_name }} for the course {{ feed_item.course.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}

{{ comment.user.name }} {{ comment.text | truncate: (comment.length || comment_display_length) }}   read more hide

{{ comment.time_ago }}

started the course {{ feed_item.course.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}
followed {{ feed_item.model.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}
followed thier friend {{ feed_item.model.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}
{{ feed_item.model.text }} (on the course {{ feed_item.course.name }}) — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}

{{ comment.user.name }} {{ comment.text | truncate: (comment.length || comment_display_length) }}   read more hide

{{ comment.time_ago }}