Economics of the Media

This course is offered through MRUniversity — you can add it to your Accredible profile to organize your learning, find others learning the same thing and to showcase evidence of your learning on your CV with Accredible's export features.


Course Date: Anytime (self-paced)

Price: free

Course Summary

The economics of the media and how government policy affects it.


Estimated Workload: Total video time: Runs approx 4 video hours

Course Instructors

Tyler Cowen

Tyler Cowen is Holbert L. Harris Professor of Economics at George Mason University and also Director of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He received his Ph.d. in economics from Harvard University in 1987. His book The Great Stagnation: How America Ate the Low-Hanging Fruit of Modern History, Got Sick, and Will (Eventually) Feel Better was a New York Times best-seller. In a recent poll by The Economist, he was named one of the most influential economists of the last decade, and in 2011 Bloomberg BusinessWeek dubbed him "America's Hottest Economist." Foreign Policy magazine named him as one of its "Top 100 Global Thinkers" of 2011. He co-writes the Marginal Revolution blog with Alex Tabarrok, and he is the co-author with Alex of Modern Principles: Microeconomics and Modern Principles: Macroeconomics, two introductory texts.

Alex Tabarrok

Alex Tabarrok is Bartley J. Madden Chair in Economics at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He is the co-author with Tyler Cowen of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution and co-founder of the online educational platform Marginal Revolution University. He is the author of the recent e-book Launching the Innovation Renaissance (TED books) and co-author with Tyler Cowen of Modern Principles of Economics, a leading principles of economics textbook.

Course Description

In the Information Age, media is everywhere. This course will help you make sense of it all, providing insight into the structure of media firms, the nature of their products and how they make money.

Is media biased? Is consolidation of media companies bad for consumers? This course will address those questions as well as how the government affects the structure of media through policies such as net neutrality, copyright, TV regulation, and spectrum allocation. 

This course will provide a general background on the research from economists on media and journalism. There will be a lot of economics and not too much math. 

If you pass the final exam, you will earn our "Economics of the Media" certificate on your profile.

Syllabus

Course Workload

Total video time: Runs approx 4 video hours

Review course:

Please sign in to review this course.

Similar Courses


{{ course.name }} {{ course.name }}

{{ course.name}}

{{course.start_date | date:'MMM d'}} — {{ course.end_date | date:'MMM d'}}   ({{ course.time_until_course_starts }} ,   length: {{ course.length_in_weeks }} weeks) Self-paced — no deadlines    
${{ course.price }} p/mfree
TO-LEARN
TO-LEARN
ADDED!

REMOVE
FROM
LIST
ON PROFILE

Course Activity & Community

Be the first Accredible user to join this course!





uploaded {{ feed_item.model.caption || feed_item.model.url || feed_item.model.file_file_name }} for the course {{ feed_item.course.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}

{{ comment.user.name }} {{ comment.text | truncate: (comment.length || comment_display_length) }}   read more hide

{{ comment.time_ago }}

started the course {{ feed_item.course.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}
followed {{ feed_item.model.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}
followed thier friend {{ feed_item.model.name }} — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}
{{ feed_item.model.text }} (on the course {{ feed_item.course.name }}) — {{ feed_item.time_ago }}

{{ comment.user.name }} {{ comment.text | truncate: (comment.length || comment_display_length) }}   read more hide

{{ comment.time_ago }}